During these challenging times, we are continuing to advocate for every North Carolinian to have access to the reproductive healthcare they need. We know these healthcare needs don’t disappear during a global pandemic. Losing access, or denying access, to contraception and abortion services during this time has the potential to create an additional public health crisis within the current COVID-19 crisis. No one should be denied access to timely reproductive healthcare services. To help North Carolinians navigate access during this time, we have created this resource page, which we will do our best to update as needed.

Abortion Access in North Carolina
Including a List of Abortion Clinics

Note: if you need specialized care , such as abortion later in pregnancy (>20 weeks), or other referral needs, you can call the National Abortion Federation hotline for a referral to a provider:  1-877-257-0012, Monday through Friday, 9:00am-5:00pm (there is no funding assistance on this hotline).

You can also check out the Provide referral webpage, which will direct you to the closest provider wherever you are in the country; or the Ineedana.com website for referrals and information about providers.

The M+A Hotline is a confidential, private and secure hotline you can call or text to speak to doctor about abortion or miscarriage: 1-833-246-2632, available 10:00am-10:00pm in all time zones.

Abortion clinics are still open in North Carolina, because abortion is essential, time sensitive health care.  You can read the American College of OB/GYNs statement on continuing to provide abortion care during the COVID-19 public health crisis.

State requirements for accessing abortion in North Carolina:

  • Abortion providers are required to read a state-mandated script written by politicians prior to patients obtaining an abortion.
    • This script is required to be read to you 72 hours prior to your appointment.
  • Patients under 18 year of age must obtain parental consent from one parent/guardian prior to obtaining an abortion.
    • If parental consent is not an option, minor patients can legally get a “judicial bypass” to obtain an abortion. This is done through the courts system. The Carolina Abortion Fund and the ACLU of North Carolina have partnered to offer a text helpline for patients who need help getting a judicial bypass:  TEXT Abby at
      1-844-997-2229, available daily from 9:00am-12:00pm(EST). This service is free.
    • For more information on this process, you can check the Carolina Abortion Fund’s page here.
  • Telemedicine for medication abortion has been banned in North Carolina since 2013.

Click on the below clinic links for more information, including directions to the clinics. Each clinic has a variety of information about their services and available resources, assistance with funding, and FAQs on their websites. Each of the below clinics is certified by the National Abortion Federation.

Asheville

Planned Parenthood South Atlantic, Asheville Health Center 

Tel: (828) 252-7298

Address: 68 McDowell Street; Asheville, NC 28801

Hours: Check link for hours. Closed Sundays and Mondays.

Appointments can be made online, or by calling the number above. Patients can walk-in anytime the clinic is open if emergency contraception (“morning after pill”) is needed. Birth control and STI testing and treatment are available here.

Chapel Hill

Planned Parenthood South Atlantic, Chapel Hill Health Center 

Tel: (919) 942-7762

Address: 1765 Dobbins Drive; Chapel Hill, NC 27514

Hours: Check link for hours. Closed Sundays and Mondays.

Appointments can be made online, or by calling the number above. Patients can walk-in anytime the clinic is open if emergency contraception (“morning after pill”) is needed. Birth control and STI testing and treatment are available here. Spanish language services are available, as well as interpretation for other languages.

Charlotte

A Preferred Women’s Health Center, Charlotte

Tel: (888) 562-7415

Address: 3220 Latrobe Drive; Charlotte, NC 28211

Hours: Call for hours

Appointments can be made online, or by calling the number above. Free pregnancy testing is available and does not require an appointment.

A Woman’s Choice of Charlotte

Tel: (704) 367-2255

Address: 421 North Wendover Road; Charlotte, NC 28211

Hours: Monday – Thursday 8:00am-5:30pm, Friday 8:00am-5:00pm, Saturday 7:30am-1:00pm, closed Sundays

The clinic has additional information about services during the COVID-19 crisis – read more hereAppointments can be made online, or by calling the number above.  Pregnancy testing, at a reduced fee, is available as a walk-in appointment during the week, or by appointment on Saturdays. Birth control and some STI testing and treatment are available here.

Family Reproductive Health Center

Tel: (704) 551-0808 or (800) 952-9034

Address:700 East Hebron Street; Charlotte, NC 28273

Hours: Monday – Friday 9:00am-5:30pm, Saturday 8:00am-1:00pm

Patients can walk-in anytime the clinic is open to get a pregnancy test (for a fee). The clinic also offers reproductive healthcare such as pap smears and breast exams, birth control, and some STI testing and treatment.

Planned Parenthood South Atlantic, Charlotte Health Center 

Tel: (704) 536-7233

Address: 700 South Torrence Street; Charlotte, NC 28204

Hours: Check link for hours. Closed Sundays and Mondays.

Appointments can be made online, or by calling the number above. Patients can walk-in anytime the clinic is open if emergency contraception (“morning after pill”) is needed. Birth control and STI testing and treatment are available here, as well as a range of women’s and men’s reproductive health services.

Durham

North Durham Women’s Health

Tel: (919) 908-6449 or (855) 443-4892

Address: 400-B Crutchfield Street; Durham, NC 27704

Hours: Call the above number between 8:00am-3:00pm Monday-Friday to schedule an appointment

Pregnancy testing is available from 9:00am-12:00pm Monday-Friday for a fee. An appointment is not required, but it is recommend you call before you want to come in.

Fayetteville

Hallmark Women’s Clinic

Tel: (910) 323-3792 or (800) 682-8677 (24-hour appointment line)

Address: 1919 Gillespie Street; Fayetteville, NC 28306

Hours: 9:00am-4:00pm Monday-Friday. Evening and weekend appointments may be available upon request.

Appointments can be booked online. The clinic also offers emergency contraception and birth control.

Planned Parenthood South Atlantic, Fayetteville Health Center

Tel: (866) 942-7762

Address: 4551 Yadkin Road; Fayetteville, NC 28303

Hours: Check link for hours. Closed Sundays and Mondays

Appointments can be made online, or by calling the number above. Birth control and STI testing and treatment are available, as well as a range of women’s and men’s reproductive health services.  Spanish language services are available, as well as interpretation for other languages.

Greensboro

A Woman’s Choice of Greensboro

Tel: (336) 273-9485

Address: 2425 Randleman Road; Greensboro, NC 27406

Hours: Monday – Thursday 8:00am-5:00pm, Friday 8:00am-4:30pm, Saturday 8:00am-2:00pm, closed Sundays (Note: you can call the clinic until 6:00pm Monday-Friday, and until 5:00pm on Saturday)

The clinic has additional information about services during the COVID-19 crisis – read more here.  Patients can call for an appointment, or make an appointment online.  Pregnancy testing, at a reduced fee, is available as a walk-in appointment during the week, or by appointment on Saturdays. Birth control and some STI testing and treatment are available here.

Raleigh

A Preferred Women’s Health Center, Raleigh

Tel: (919) 854-7888

Address: 1604 Jones Franklin Road; Raleigh, NC 27606

Hours: Call for hours

Appointments can be made online, or by calling the number above. Free pregnancy testing is available and does not require an appointment.

A Woman’s Choice of Raleigh

Tel: (919) 781-6811

Address: 3305 Drake Circle; Raleigh, NC 27607

Hours: Monday – Thursday 8:00am-5:00pm, Friday 8:00am-4:300pm, Saturday 8:00am-2:00pm, closed Sundays

The clinic has additional information about services during the COVID-19 crisis – read more here.  Patients can call for an appointment, or make an appointment online.  Pregnancy testing, at a reduced fee, is available as a walk-in appointment during the week, or by appointment on Saturdays. Birth control and some STI testing and treatment are available here.

Wilmington

Planned Parenthood South Atlantic, Wilmington Health Center 

Tel: (910) 762-5566

Address: 1925 Tradd Court; Wilmington, NC 28410

Hours: Check link for hours. Closed Sundays and Mondays.

Appointments can be made online, or by calling the number above. Patients can walk-in anytime the clinic is open if emergency contraception (“morning after pill”) is needed. Birth control and STI testing and treatment are available here. Spanish language services are available, as well as interpretation for other languages.

Winston Salem

Hallmark Women’s Clinic

Tel: (336) 725-4924 or (888) 775-8524 (24-hour appointment line)

Address: 491 N Cleveland Avenue; Winston Salem, NC 27101

Hours: Call clinic for hours

Appointments can be booked online. The clinic only offers medication abortion. It also offers emergency contraception and birth control.

Planned Parenthood South Atlantic, Winston Salem Health Center 

Tel: (336) 768-2980

Address: 3000 Maple Wood Avenue, Suite 112; Winston Salem, NC 27103

Hours: Check link for hours. Closed Sundays and Mondays.

Appointments can be made online, or by calling the number above. Patients can walk in anytime the clinic is open if emergency contraception (“morning after pill”) is needed. Birth control and STI testing and treatment are available here.

Funding Assistance for Abortion

In North Carolina, state lawmakers opposed to abortion have passed a number of laws that prohibit much public insurance and some private insurance from covering abortion care (read more about these laws here).  These laws can make it challenging for many people to be able to access abortion care when they need it. There are community funds available that patients can call if they need help paying for an abortion. Some of these funds may also be able to help with other costs associated with your appointment, like travel or lodging costs.

Carolina Abortion Fund

Serves North and South Carolina. Call or text their free, confidential hotline at (855) 518-4603.  If you call, you will be asked to leave a message with the following information, and they will return your call (from a blocked number).

National Abortion Federation Hotline Fund

Nationwide. Call their toll free line at (800) 772-9100.  The line is available weekdays from 7:00am-11:00pm, and on Saturday and Sunday from 9:00am-5:00pm.

National Network of Abortion Funds

Nationwide. This is a centralized directory of abortion funds that are available in different parts of the country. Go to their website to enter the city and state where your appointment is located to find an abortion fund that serves your area.

Protesters at Clinics

When you arrive at some of the clinics in North Carolina, you may see anti-abortion protestors holding false, inflammatory and/or shaming signs, and sharing misleading or medically inaccurate information. They may be wearing medical scrubs or traffic control vests, and trying to redirect you to the wrong parking lot or building. You are not obligated to speak with them, take any of their materials, or engage with them in any way.

At many clinics, there will be clinic volunteers who are there to escort patients to and from the clinic. They may be wearing vests that say “Clinic Escorts” (usually rainbow-colored) or something else that identifies them as clinic “greeters”. They will guide you to the clinic parking lot and escort you into and out of the clinic.

During the COVID-19 public health emergency, many of these patient escort programs have suspended or reduced their services in accordance with local, county and state public health guidelines. When you make your appointment, be sure to ask clinic staff if there are any signs, landmarks, or issues you need to be aware of when coming to the clinic for your appointment, and also ask them for directions into the parking lot and to the front door.

How to Avoid Fake Clinics

During this time, it is vital that you also know how to avoid fake clinics, also known as crisis pregnancy centers (CPCs). These organizations are not abortion providers and do not provide medically accurate information on reproductive healthcare services.

What are fake clinics?

A fake clinic (also known as “crisis pregnancy centers”), are anti-abortion, non-profit organizations that pose as real medical facilities with the intention of shaming, scaring, and deceiving people out of accessing the full range of reproductive healthcare services including abortion care, emergency contraception, and birth control. Fake clinics are notorious for peddling misinformation about reproductive healthcare and often have affiliations to local anti-abortion religious organizations and/or national anti-abortion groups. They are not obligated to provide people with medically accurate information, nor are they required to maintain confidentiality of people’s health information, as they are not medical providers.

How do I spot a fake clinic?

We know that navigating the world of reproductive healthcare can already be tricky. When time is of the essence and resources may be limited, make sure you’re going to a legitimate, safe, and trusted reproductive healthcare clinic. Here are a few red flags to be on the lookout for:

  •  Don’t trust the name alone. Fake clinics often purposefully choose names that sound pro-choice or like a reproductive health medical center, like “A Women’s Clinic” (Raleigh, NC) or “Hope Pregnancy Center” (Boone, NC).
  •  Look for religious affiliations. Many fake clinics are funded by or have affiliations with local churches that hold anti-abortion beliefs. You may see references to religion on their website or when speaking with people at the fake clinic.  While a religious affiliation alone does not mean it is a fake clinic, many anti-abortion fake clinics are connected to a local faith community that believes abortion should be illegal, and that access to birth control should be limited to married, heterosexual couples.
  • Are they a licensed medical facility? Fake clinics operate as non-profits, meaning they are not bound to the same safety or confidentiality standards like your trusted healthcare provider. They are not bound by HIPAA, and often they do not have doctors or nurses on staff. They may use misleading language like “Nurse Manager” or “Patient Advocate” to mislead you into thinking they are medical professionals. Real medical clinics are run by board certified and licensed physicians and staffed by medical professionals. A National Abortion Federation (NAF) accreditation is one indication that a clinic is an actual abortion clinic.
  • Do they offer “free” supplies or “post-abortion counseling?” Many fake clinics will lure in vulnerable people who are considering their options by promising supplies like money, food, and diapers, in an effort to coerce a person into carrying a pregnancy to term even if they don’t want to. These products may be free, but they also may require clients to watch religious DVDs/videos, go to church, or participate in a religiously-themed program to obtain the free products. They may also offer “post-abortion support groups,” peddling the disproven myth that many people regret their abortions.
  •  What medical services do they provide? Because many fake clinics don’t actually have licensed medical staff, they do not offer the full range of reproductive healthcare options. They will not be able to write prescriptions for things like birth control, they will not be able to provide STI treatment or wellness exams, they promote medically inaccurate abstinence-only methods, and they certainly won’t provide an abortion, or refer you to one. They may offer free ultrasounds, but say they are only “limited use” or “non-diagnostic”.
  • Do they push you to make an appointment? A real medical provider will never pressure you into making an appointment. Fake clinics will often refuse to answer your questions over the phone or disclose any information unless you make an appointment. They may sidestep your questions by saying things like “We can talk about that when you come in,” or “Let’s make an appointment first, and then we’ll review your options.” If you feel like they are being evasive about sharing information over the phone or if you feel like you’re being pressured to come in for an appointment, you’re probably talking to a fake clinic.
  •  Always look at their website. Sometimes fake clinics have two websites. One is for potential “patients,” and one is for their anti-abortion advocacy. Or their home page may talk about providing “non-judgmental health care”, but their donation page highlights their efforts block people from accessing abortion and spread anti-abortion messages. They may say on their website that they don’t provide abortions, or they may say outright their anti-abortion beliefs. If you can’t tell from their website, give them a call. Ask them directly if they provide abortions, refer people for abortion care, or if they are a licensed medical facility.
  • The clinic pushes the dangerous and untrue “abortion reversal pill.” This is an unproven practice based on medically insufficient and unethical research that neither the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) nor the American Medical Association (AMA) recommends.

What common inaccurate information do fake clinics spread?

The goal of a fake clinic is to coerce and deceive people out of accessing abortion. Investigative research shows that there are a number of common lies told by fake clinics intended to shame and scare people away from all of their options. Some of the most common are:

  • Abortion and contraception are linked to breast cancer. FALSEthere is no legitimate medical evidence to support this falsehood.
  • Abortion causes infertility. FALSEthere is not medical evidence to support this inaccurate claim.
  • Abortion causes mental health issues like PTSD, and many women are traumatized and regret their abortions. FALSEactual studies show that the majority of women do not regret their abortions.
  • Birth control is not effective against protecting against an unintended pregnancy. FALSE – this is not true.
  • Condoms are not effective against protecting users from STIs. FALSEwhen used correctly, condoms are a very effective barrier against STI transmission.

You can read more about fake clinics in North Carolina on our website here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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